Reykjavík

So now we have reached the end of the photos I took during my travels before school started.  Now comes the studying.  Last semester (Fall 2011) began and classes got off to a good start.  Since I am updating this site so late, though, I’ll also add that they got off to a good finish.  They were really very enjoyable.  But since they don’t involve a great many photos, I won’t talk so much about them in this post.  This time I’ll just show you the earliest pictures I took of Reykjavík.

So to start off, here’s a rainbow.  For the first month or two, I saw these every few days.  Since I don’t see them that often in Texas, I assumed I was just getting really lucky to see them so often.  Thinking I ought not to take them for granted, I took lots and lots of rainbow pictures, so many, in fact, that they really all started to look the same to me.  As it turns out, Icelanders don’t think much of rainbows because they happen so often.  I’ll spare you too many more, but here’s one more:

A while back I commented on the abundance of geese here in Iceland.  Reykjavík is a especially engoosed.  They walk down the streets just like people and pigeons (though here they outnumber the pigeons).  Here they are hanging out on campus:

This statue here is interesting.  I couldn’t tell you what exactly it is meant to portray.  The first time I saw it, I assumed it was Þórr smiting Jörmungandr, but on closer investigation, it became clear that this was not a serpent, but a giant fish, and the man is attacking it not with a hammer, but with what appears to be the first volume of the condensed Oxford English Dictionary.  I’ll have to get a closer picture of it so you too can be baffled.

Anyway, I live in student housing which is very near to the city’s duck-pond (for this read goose-pond).  The area around the duck-pond is pretty.  Back before winter hit and the world froze over, it was also nice for running around.  Without further ado, the duck-pond:

You’ll notice Hallgrímskirkja in the background.  I like this shot.  I particularly like how close together the moon and the cathedral were willing to stand for the picture.  My siblings and I won’t even stand that close for pictures.  I think this warrants another shot.

Oh, if only my camera were a higher resolution.  Oh well.

Student housing is really pretty nice, all things considered.  My room is on the second floor, but even from this close to the ground there’s a pretty nice view.

This is part of the view out my window.  I’m sorry if you’re tired of seeing Hallgrímskirkja.  Let me show you what I see when I look left of this.

I’m sorry this isn’t a particularly great picture.  I think this mountain is Esja.  If so, then you’ll be seeing more pictures of this later when I tell you about my hiking trip.

The following picture won’t really be of much interest because the intended subject of the photo didn’t turn out.  Alas, Reykjavík’s city lights make the Aurora Borealis very difficult to photograph.  They do not, however, make them difficult to see without a camera.  The first time I saw these was in late September.  You really ought to try to see them at some point, if you haven’t already.  They’re just stunning.  You won’t notice that in this picture, though.As with the whales and other topics I’ve photographed here, there are much better photos available elsewhere.  I’ve included this one just to prove that I tried to photograph the lights.  So as not to end on a really dull note, I’m including one more picture from the zoo.  Perhaps you’ll enjoy it.

Thanks so much for reading.

B.

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